My OTP'sAnime ListDestiel/SPN Fic RecDean/Cas BigBang 2012
I'm as mad as I am, but no madder.
Laura, 17 years old and 100% Canadian. This blog will contain loads of Supernatural with chances of Doctor Who, Sherlock, Merlin, In the Flesh, Marvel, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, Achievement Hunter, and an abundant amount of anime. And pretty much everything is gay.
Do Enjoy Yourself!

fuck-kirk:

candyassgoth:

encores:

Completely Rational fears about baby Steve Rogers

I will always reblog

All things said by Bucky Barnes

(Source: encores-moved)

papershopprojects:

huffingtonpost:

HERE’S WHAT ‘YELLOW FEVER’ REALLY MEANS

"All my ex-girlfriends are Asian."

If you’ve ever come across this charming come-on, you’ve probably been exposed to yellow fever

For her full rant watch the video here.

YES, THERE IS NOW A MUCH NEEDED GIF SET FOR THIS!

carudamon119:

リアル過ぎるポケモン図鑑 ‏@real__poke  
ぴかちゅうは 運動が 苦手みたい

carudamon119:

リアル過ぎるポケモン図鑑 ‏@real__poke  

ぴかちゅうは 運動が 苦手みたい

(Source: pic.twitter.com)

西谷夕

(Source: raikiririn)

please be as weird as me please be as weird as me please be as weird as me

me every time I meet someone (via miel-lapin)

casisinlovewithdean:

imgonnariverdance:

nuclearpiss:

aparselmouthspatronous:

ehehehelokid:

fallencastiels:

i-cant-nope:

carryonmy-assbutt:

pure-purgatory:

feathers-theangel:

i’m not gonna say it
im not gonna say it

can I say it?
cAN I SAY IT?

someone say it!
soMEONE SAY IT!

ANYTIME NOW

SHOULD I SAY IT OR NOT?

I CAN SAY IT


you said it

i hope that’s paint



it got better

casisinlovewithdean:

imgonnariverdance:

nuclearpiss:

aparselmouthspatronous:

ehehehelokid:

fallencastiels:

i-cant-nope:

carryonmy-assbutt:

pure-purgatory:

feathers-theangel:

i’m not gonna say it

im not gonna say it

can I say it?

cAN I SAY IT?

someone say it!

soMEONE SAY IT!

ANYTIME NOW

SHOULD I SAY IT OR NOT?

I CAN SAY IT

you said it

i hope that’s paint

it got better

(Source: exbloodjunkie)

queefjerkey:

my blog is rated g for gay

avatardedpotterhead:

dicksconnected:

i dont understand why guys wont buy tampons because:

  1. NO one thinks theyre for you
  2. actually everyone thinks youre the sweetest person ever and there is a 103% chance i will date u
  3. nobody thinks theyre for you calm the fuck down

4. they’ll probably assume you have a girlfriend

kingofbeartraps:

dandelionofthanatos:

ivorytowerblr:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.
"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."
"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."


(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)
This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

I’d also like to point out that we DO NOT do surgery the same way we did even 100 years ago. One of the cool things I learned while working with a pathologist is that you can now remove a (non-ruptured) appendix and gall bladder through a person’s navel. No huge ass scar, no lengthy recovery. Out through the navel it goes.
Most of the time, unless the damage is extensive, surgeons make incredibly tiny holes in an effort to minimize damage and maximize healing. Hell, I’ve seen articles about being able to do surgery BY REMOTE CONTROL thanks to advanced computer systems. There was one surgeon who practiced surgery on a 3D printed heart because the child whose life they were going to save had such a rare defect that few had ever done the surgery before.
Don’t drag the medical profession into your assertion that we can’t examine what we do and ask if there’s a better way. They do it all the time.

yes to all this.
i get quarterly physicals because of a genetic condition what needs constant eyeballing just in case. every time i arrive at the clinic there’s new study results on some bulletin board or something. sometimes it’s about new medication. sometimes it’s about a new way to use medications that’re tried and true because maybe we can get more out of them. sometimes it’s about a procedure, and “is there a better way we can go about doing the thing?” is a CONSTANT QUESTION as IT said above.
so is “well, we have been doing the thing THIS way for ages but that’s based on old-ass data and does not work well for everyone; we should therefore do the thing THIS way for some people, THAT way for others, and DO THIS OTHER THING for yet more people, in order to make things work the best possible way.”
and yeah i’m describing things a little dorkily but that’s the basic gist of HOW IT HONESTLY WORKS. doctors worth their salt are constantly re-examining and learning and listening and CHANGING STUFF UP because they know that tried-and-true is not always best-thing-ever.
so yeah the whinebabby with the cackhanded change-is-bad-waaaaahhhh argument can shut the entire fuck up until they educate themselves…because my happy ass would not even be here if doctors did not change things up, learn, examine, and adjust their treatments and techniques as new data became available.
i am walking talking proof that crap-for-brains is wrong.

I’d also like to point out that the process for replacing certain portions of the heart (like, oh, the ascending aorta, otherwise known as the bane of my family’s existence) is changing pretty much as we speak. The current method involves implanting a replacement aorta from a cow, horse or pig to serve where the aorta the patient was born with no longer can.
The new method being trialed and pushed presently is a 3D printed version of the patient’s aorta, made of a material that won’t stretch to the point of rupture. Not animal parts.
Frankly, if I ever have to get mine replaced, I’ll be a lot more comfortable with using the new method—even if the current method is the one that we’ve “always used,” it’s still essentially frankensteining a patient’s cardiovascular system and putting them on immunosuppressants for the rest of their life to keep their own body from attacking the only thing keeping them alive. And that, personally, makes me horribly uncomfortable.
The man who came up with the new method (an engineer, if I’m recalling correctly) has actually been told repeatedly that his method is under scrutiny and unsafe because, I kid you not, it’s just not how things are done.
There is nothing worse than tradition and comfort getting in the way of progress, especially when people’s lives are at stake.

kingofbeartraps:

dandelionofthanatos:

ivorytowerblr:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

I’d also like to point out that we DO NOT do surgery the same way we did even 100 years ago. One of the cool things I learned while working with a pathologist is that you can now remove a (non-ruptured) appendix and gall bladder through a person’s navel. No huge ass scar, no lengthy recovery. Out through the navel it goes.

Most of the time, unless the damage is extensive, surgeons make incredibly tiny holes in an effort to minimize damage and maximize healing. Hell, I’ve seen articles about being able to do surgery BY REMOTE CONTROL thanks to advanced computer systems. There was one surgeon who practiced surgery on a 3D printed heart because the child whose life they were going to save had such a rare defect that few had ever done the surgery before.

Don’t drag the medical profession into your assertion that we can’t examine what we do and ask if there’s a better way. They do it all the time.

yes to all this.

i get quarterly physicals because of a genetic condition what needs constant eyeballing just in case. every time i arrive at the clinic there’s new study results on some bulletin board or something. sometimes it’s about new medication. sometimes it’s about a new way to use medications that’re tried and true because maybe we can get more out of them. sometimes it’s about a procedure, and “is there a better way we can go about doing the thing?” is a CONSTANT QUESTION as IT said above.

so is “well, we have been doing the thing THIS way for ages but that’s based on old-ass data and does not work well for everyone; we should therefore do the thing THIS way for some people, THAT way for others, and DO THIS OTHER THING for yet more people, in order to make things work the best possible way.”

and yeah i’m describing things a little dorkily but that’s the basic gist of HOW IT HONESTLY WORKS. doctors worth their salt are constantly re-examining and learning and listening and CHANGING STUFF UP because they know that tried-and-true is not always best-thing-ever.

so yeah the whinebabby with the cackhanded change-is-bad-waaaaahhhh argument can shut the entire fuck up until they educate themselves…because my happy ass would not even be here if doctors did not change things up, learn, examine, and adjust their treatments and techniques as new data became available.

i am walking talking proof that crap-for-brains is wrong.

I’d also like to point out that the process for replacing certain portions of the heart (like, oh, the ascending aorta, otherwise known as the bane of my family’s existence) is changing pretty much as we speak. The current method involves implanting a replacement aorta from a cow, horse or pig to serve where the aorta the patient was born with no longer can.

The new method being trialed and pushed presently is a 3D printed version of the patient’s aorta, made of a material that won’t stretch to the point of rupture. Not animal parts.

Frankly, if I ever have to get mine replaced, I’ll be a lot more comfortable with using the new method—even if the current method is the one that we’ve “always used,” it’s still essentially frankensteining a patient’s cardiovascular system and putting them on immunosuppressants for the rest of their life to keep their own body from attacking the only thing keeping them alive. And that, personally, makes me horribly uncomfortable.

The man who came up with the new method (an engineer, if I’m recalling correctly) has actually been told repeatedly that his method is under scrutiny and unsafe because, I kid you not, it’s just not how things are done.

There is nothing worse than tradition and comfort getting in the way of progress, especially when people’s lives are at stake.

(Source: uvmsemba)

thespywhospies:

Impressive wings Cas, even if they're stolen. 

Season 10 Wishlist
- Cas catches up to Dean who was on the run and they view each others’ trueform for the first time.

jyuubi.org